Sallow Wattle - Acacia longifolia

Undeniably a pretty acacia - bright green all year, and brilliant yellow flowers in Spring. Just not in the bush, where it shades out the grasses!

Sallow Wattle - Acacia longifolia

Sallow Wattle growing into Barrm Birrm

Sallow Wattle, Acacia longifolia, is originally from the New South Wales coastal hinterland and was brought into cultivation as an ornamental plant very early in Australia’s settlement. Along with Coastal Wattle, Acacia longifolia ssp. sophorae, Sallow Wattle has been distributed widely across Australia and the world through the nursery trade and through poorly informed government revegetation and soil stabilisation programs.

It grows as a small tree, 3 to 10 m high, and up to 10 m wide, and bears dense, yellow, cylindrical spikes in late winter and spring. The phyllodes (leaves) are bright “leafy green” compared to most other wattles. The leaves are between 8 – 20 centimetres in length (hence the name 'longifolia') and 1 -2.5 centimetres in width, with 2 to 4 veins that run longitudinally along the leaf with many interconnecting ‘minor’ veins. Bark on younger branches is green or reddish-green in colour, the older stems become greyish in colour and either smooth or finely fissured.

Pull out seedlings by hand, and for larger plants, cut the trunk at ground level, taking care to cut
below the lowest active bud especially on juvenile plants otherwise there is a risk of re-shooting.

Sallow Wattle - Acacia longifolia

A juvenile sallow pulled out by hand

Sallow Wattle - Acacia longifolia

Sallow Wattle in Barrm Birrm